GET YOUR KICKS ON RTE 66 . PART SIX

GET YOUR KICKS ON ROUTE 66 PART  SIX … January  5th, 2013  Arizona

Welcome to Arizona

Welcome to Arizona

We’re in Navajo Land.

Navajo Land in AZ

Navajo Land in AZ

Next a 4 and a half hour trek through the Painted Desert and the Petrified Forest.  Words cannot describe the beauty.  Pictures barely show its uniqueness.  It is truly something to be seen in person.

Painted Desert

Painted Desert

Painted Desert

Painted Desert

Painted Desert - No Snow

Painted Desert – No Snow

Painted Desert from the other side - Snow

Painted Desert from the other side – Snow

Bird Waiting for Food

Bird Waiting for Food

Within 5 feet of Bird -- they welcome the tourists. No fear there.

Within 5 feet of Bird — they welcome the tourists. No fear there.

Between the Painted Desert and the Petrified Forest is Puerco Pueblo.  It is a 100 room pueblo built around 1250.  It may have housed about 200 people.  Much of it has been excavated.

Excavated Indian Village

Excavated Indian Village

Indian VillageIndian Village (4)Excavation

Excavation (2)Kiva

Kiva

Kiva

Entering the Petrified Forest is Newspaper Rock with hundreds of Petroglyphs etched into the stone.

Pyroglyphics (4)Pyroglyphics (3)Pyroglyphics (2)

The Tepees stand in cone-shaped formations and are layered in blues, purples and grays.

TeePee Mountains

In the Petrified Forest

TeePee Mountains Painted Dessert (4)

Note the bird in the foreground…. it follow us.  Probably because Bill fed it some caramel corn (only thing we had) and the big black bird obviously liked it… A Lot!

Bird Followed Us

Jasper Forest has hundreds of petrified logs that were once encased in the bluff and strewn across the valley below.  Crystal Forest and Trail is a paved trail through landscape of colorful petrified logs.

Petrified Log (2)

Petrified Log

Agate Bridge, is shown on the right. This petrified tree originally lay flat on the ground until the arroyo which now runs beneath it was formed by erosion. The log bridge was shored up with the concrete support in 1917, perhaps preserving the bridge but adding nothing the genuine nature of the feature.

Agate Bridge

Agate Bridge (2)

Other sites in the Petrified Forest

Petrified Wood

Petrified Log (5)

Petrified Wood (2)

If you are made of heartier stuff than I, you will want to take the trail that leads to the Agate House.  The Agate House has quite a history and shows how innovative the Pueblo people were.  Bill, not wanting to miss a single thing, did take the trail to the house and got some amazing pictures.

This link will provide you with the history and reconstruction efforts of the Agate House.

http://www.nps.gov/pefo/historyculture/agate-house.htm

Agate House

Agate House

Agate House - Window

Agate House – Window

Exterior - closeup

Exterior – closeup

Interior - ladder

Interior – ladder

Agate House (13)

Interior - closeup 1

Interior – closeup 1

Interior - closeup 2

Interior – closeup 2

While he was doing that I hung out at the center and took a few pictures as well.

Man with his horse.  He went through a lot of red tape to be able to ride his horse here.  He loves it and so do the visitors.

Man with his horse. He went through a lot of red tape to be able to ride his horse here. He loves it and so do the visitors.

Flowers and wood.  There are over 400 species of plants in the park.

Flowers and wood. There are over 400 species of plants in the park.

Four and a half hours and probably close to 300 pictures later it was time to move on to Winslow, AZ for a little less intense sightseeing.

Winslow’s claim to fame is that old song  “Standin’ On The Corner.

Standin' on the Corner Winslow (3)

Sorry Bill, no girls!

Sorry Bill, no girls!

Standin'on the corner b

Tore down the building, but the front wall stands.  Interesting.

Tore down the building, but the front wall stands. Interesting.

Headed for Flagstaff to try to get to Walnut Canyon National Monument before the sun set.

The Sinaguas lived in Walnut Canyon until about 1250 AD.  left over 80 cliff dwellings behind. The Sinagua built their homes under limestone ledges, deep within the canyon, some time between 1125 and 1250 AD. The dwellings themselves were small, but large enough for the inhabitants to cook and sleep.   No one knows why they left, but they left approximately 80 cliff dwellings.   If you zoom in on the pictures you will be able to see their dwellings.  The sun was fading fast and the park was closed so this is the closest we could come.  It’s worth a revisit.

Cliff Dwellings

Cliff Dwellings

And so ends Day 6 of our travels.

4 Comments on “GET YOUR KICKS ON RTE 66 . PART SIX

  1. This is beautiful, Heidi! I know that we will never get to see any of it in “real life”, so it means a lot to see this country through your eyes.
    Thank you,
    Coppy

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